Green Man T-Shirts

Green Man Mugs

Green Man Jewellery by Clive Barrett


Green Man Pewter Pendant
Height 34mm, £10.00
Large Green Man Pewter Pendant
Height 50mm, £25.00
Long Green Man Pewter Pendant
Height 44mm, £10.00



Heavy Green Man Pewter Pendant
Height 41mm, £12.00


Pointed Green Man Pewter Pendant
Height 44mm, £10.00

Pointed Green Man Pewter Key Ring
Height 44mm, £10.00


Oak Leaf Green Man Pewter Pendant
Height 35mm. £12.00
Oak Leaf Green Man Pewter Key Ring
Height 35mm. £12.00
Green Man - Medium Pewter Pendant
Height 30mm. £8.00


Small Oak Green Man Pewter Pendant
Height 16mm, £5.00
Small Ivy Green Man Pewter Pendant
Height 18mm, £5.00
Acorn and Oak Leaf
Pewter Pendant

£15.00

 


 

Green Man T-Shirts

Green Man Mugs

 

 
 

About the Green Man

Carvings of the Green Man can be seen in many of the country’s oldest churches. He can often be found looking down from high in the masonry onto the congregation below.

They were common throughout the Medieval period and in some ecclesiastical buildings- Canterbury Cathedral for example, they may be counted in the dozens.

This popularity came to an abrupt end, in Britain at least, with the Reformation. The new simplified approach to Christianity brought about a backlash against the colourful and symbolic imagery of the Roman Church.

Sculptures, paintings, windows and decorations of all kinds, not only Green Men, were destroyed, white washed over or simply forgotten.

Much later, with the Victorian Gothic Revival, the Green Man became popular once again. It was an accepted design element in the sculptors repertoire and from this time onwards may be seen in both religious and secular buildings including churches, civic buildings and private houses.

While the carvings date back to the middle ages, the application of the name “Green Man” to them is of more recent origin. In the 1930s, Lady Raglan visited the church of St. Jerome, Monmouthshire, where the Reverend J. Griffith drew her attention to the carved foliate heads in his church.

Lady Raglan wrote about these heads in an article for the Folklore Society. She titled her piece “The Green Man”.